Recovery

Skydiving into Holiday Dinners

Image source: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/264305071855876860/

There’s a fine line between skydiving and holiday dinners — at least for those of us who struggle with disordered eating.

Walking into your grandparent’s house feels less like a family reunion and more like climbing into a remarkably small airplane that you’ll jump out of momentarily. Seeing the food on the table is like glancing out of the window at twelve thousand feet. Grabbing a plate feels like free fall.

The Morning Process for Living a Life You Love

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We Are Ruled by Our Rituals or Habits

Through my experience as an eating disorder survivor and bulimia recovery coach, I’ve learned that our lives are made up of our daily rituals, or habits...To move past your eating disorder it’s important to replace those obsessive thought habits about food and disempowering behavior patterns with new habits that empower and uplift you.

The Choice - Navigating ED Recovery as a Person with Cerebral Palsy

Imagine someone blindfolded you to hear my conversations with my therapist over the last four years.  You would know I have anorexia nervosa. You would know that I am stable in recovery even though comments about my weight easily trigger me. To be fair, I am twice the size I was at my sickest. 

Eventually, you would learn that I have Cerebral Palsy and use a wheelchair.

Insurance: The Greatest Barrier to Recovery (Part 1)

One reason why eating disorders are so difficult to treat is because, in addition to addressing symptoms, you must first convince the patient that he or she is actually sick.

She might deny that she has any problem whatsoever with her eating habits and other behaviors. Or, even if she admits to struggling, she might insist that she is nowhere near as sick (i.e., as thin) as other patients.

A Scale Can’t Measure the Severity of Your Eating Disorder

The person sitting next to you in class or in the cubicle across from you might be suffering from a severe eating disorder. How do I know? Because that person suffering was me.

The expression,  “I had no idea,” was a consistent theme in the story of my eating disorder. “I had no idea, McCall,” the phrase I heard on repeat when I finally emerged from the eating disorder closet.

TRANSforming Recovery

Dealing with an eating disorder is a daunting, disheartening and isolating experience for anyone. It is an especially difficult struggle for those who identify as transgender or claim a gender identity that falls under the larger trans umbrella of gender diversity.

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