Recovery

Stages of Change

You have probably heard of the stages of change, a model that identifies the different stages individuals cycle through as they attempt to modify a negative behaviour...The interesting thing about these stages is that they are not linear - a person may start at the second or third stage, or they may reach the final stage and find themselves starting back at one all over again. Eating disorders (ED) are a great example of this

 

Skydiving into Holiday Dinners

Image source: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/264305071855876860/

There’s a fine line between skydiving and holiday dinners — at least for those of us who struggle with disordered eating.

Walking into your grandparent’s house feels less like a family reunion and more like climbing into a remarkably small airplane that you’ll jump out of momentarily. Seeing the food on the table is like glancing out of the window at twelve thousand feet. Grabbing a plate feels like free fall.

The Morning Process for Living a Life You Love

Image Credit: www.instagram.com/the_nedic

We Are Ruled by Our Rituals or Habits

Through my experience as an eating disorder survivor and bulimia recovery coach, I’ve learned that our lives are made up of our daily rituals, or habits...To move past your eating disorder it’s important to replace those obsessive thought habits about food and disempowering behavior patterns with new habits that empower and uplift you.

The Choice - Navigating ED Recovery as a Person with Cerebral Palsy

Imagine someone blindfolded you to hear my conversations with my therapist over the last four years.  You would know I have anorexia nervosa. You would know that I am stable in recovery even though comments about my weight easily trigger me. To be fair, I am twice the size I was at my sickest. 

Eventually, you would learn that I have Cerebral Palsy and use a wheelchair.

Insurance: The Greatest Barrier to Recovery (Part 1)

One reason why eating disorders are so difficult to treat is because, in addition to addressing symptoms, you must first convince the patient that he or she is actually sick.

She might deny that she has any problem whatsoever with her eating habits and other behaviors. Or, even if she admits to struggling, she might insist that she is nowhere near as sick (i.e., as thin) as other patients.

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