Body Image

Self-Love: The Revolution

As someone who has struggled with body acceptance for a large portion of my life, self-love  is  a revolutionary concept. When you are told so often and so frequently that who you are and what you look like is: ugly, less than, or not good enough, then telling yourself that you ARE beautiful, that you ARE worth something, that you ARE good enough, is a rebellious act.

Learning to Model Self-Acceptance in the Classroom

Over the last two years, my work life has consisted of a before-and-afterschool program and an arts program for at-risk youth. My volunteer work at NEDIC, where I facilitate body image and media literacy workshops with students, has truly helped to change my lens. Although it would be fun, I’m not here to share with you cute anecdotes about the behavior of children or the funny things they say. Instead, I’d like to give you a window into the educators and caregivers I work with and some of the unconscious behavior they routinely engage in.

A Rant about Body Positivity

Starting a blog has been one of the most rewarding challenges that I’ve ever pushed myself to complete. However, it has opened my eyes to the unfortunate amount of body shaming, and blatant disregard of human feelings, that can come as a result of standing up and saying, “Hey, I’m okay with the way I look”...

I Cry in Lahore

Trigger warning: This post contains unresolved body image issues. The original author, who wishes to remain anonymous, shares experiences which include maladaptive behaviours that may negatively affect some readers. Although the author still engages in these behaviours today, she is aware of the effect they have on her overall happiness

From Picnics to Pride Diets: Considering Body Image for LGBTQ Communities

With the queer high holiday of Pride season just around the corner, I am thinking about the importance of fostering positive body image for lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, and queer (LGBTQ) persons, of all shapes and sizes. So why would the subject of positive body image be a timely conversation as we approach Toronto Pride (June 19-28, 2015)?

Eating Disorder Recovery in a Culture that Validates Pretty Little Lies - Part Two

 

This submission was originally published on the blog Don't Live Small and featured in REglam Magazine

READ PART ONE HERE

We are constantly bombarded by the beauty and fashion industries’ toxic messaging that implies a woman’s main value and purpose is based on what she looks like, what she eats and how much she weighs. They endorse an unrealistic ideal and market a processed beauty that doesn’t exist.

Eating Disorder Recovery in a Culture that Validates Pretty Little Lies - Part One

This submission was originally published on the blog Don't Live Small and featured in REglam Magazine

There are many misconceptions out there about eating disorders. The most damaging is the perception that eating disorders are about vanity and wanting to look pretty. People suffering from this disease are often described as being in a self-absorbed phase that they just need to "get over”. But you can’t “just get over” it.

What Does Recovery Mean to You?

When my recovery journey began in September 2007, I thought I had a clear image of what that would look like. Seven years later, I now know that a linear recovery process does not exist. There is no real end to this journey. This revelation has given me a sense of relief, calmness, and clarity to live again.

Life Over Looks: A Journey Beyond the Mirror

Standing in front of the mirror, I sighed heavily. With slumped shoulders, I said, "You're disgusting" and then I started to cry, as if someone had just been incredibly cruel to me. Because someone had been incredibly cruel to me. We can be our own best ally or our own resident villain. Our relationship with ourselves shapes how we experience this world and for years, I waged a war on my body.

Diets. Don't. Work. Body Trust Does

I offer this post in honour of International No Diet Day

Diets. Don’t. Work. Even when we call them a “lifestyle change.” For so, so many reasons. But here’s one to consider. A diet provides you with rules about what you’re supposed to eat or not eat. Attempts to control your food intake through willpower and control require that you drown out the internal signals, leaving you much more vulnerable to external signals.

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