Body Image

One Size Does Not Fit All: Writing Beyond the Body Image Narrative

Image Source: Google Images

 

In a culture that pathologically reduces females to their physiques and profits from their self-perceived flaws, it’s not surprising that this body image narrative has become dominant. While this narrative provides a convenient framework and simple explanations, the assumption that eating disorders arise primarily from dissatisfaction with physical appearance masks the complexity and severity of the disease. This assumption ignores components such as genetic predisposition, psychological factors, and other sociocultural influences. It also eclipses the full spectrum of perspectives that cut across lines of gender, age, race, class, and sexual orientation.

Improving Body Image Supports For Transgender People

Many transgender, transsexual, and other gender minority (trans) people struggle to attain a positive body image and have an elevated risk of experiencing eating disorders. Perhaps two of the most important issues related to trans people and body image issues are: the lack of trans-affirming body image/eating disorder clinical treatment options, and the pressures to conform to cisgender standards of beauty that confound most trans people.

Put the Hammer Down

Image Source: http://www.public-domain-image.com/free-images/objects/tools/hammer-hand-tool-725x544.jpg

Originally posted May 2, 2015: on www.curvyoga.com at: http://www.curvyyoga.com/put-the-hammer-down/

 

“People often mistakenly think that body acceptance means you never change, but that couldn’t be true even if we wanted it to be. Our bodies are always changing, so acceptance can never be a static thing.”

That Girl Could Have Been Me

I don’t think that one can ever be fully prepared for working in the  field of eating disorder awareness and support. Having a strong background in mental health, addictions and crisis work, I thought that working as a placement student at NEDIC would be similar. However, nothing could have prepared me for the learning that was ahead. In particular, an invaluable lesson that I learned during my time with NEDIC is the importance of practicing self-care.

Sex and Eating Disorders: A Guide

 

Being the partner of someone in eating disorder recovery (I imagine, as I’m always the person in the latter category) can be rough. There’s a lot to consider — from how to compliment their bodies respectfully to how to avoid triggering them when talking about food. And if there’s one thing that complicates this delicate balance even more, it’s sex.

When Being "You" Is Not Enough

As a graduate student entering my final year of post-secondary education, I have finally come to accept that it’s okay to not be perfect, not please everyone, and to ask for “me” time without feeling guilty. It took over eight years of battling my inner critic and an eating disorder recovery program to come to this realization.

The Freshman Experience

This week thousands of students across Canada are slowly but surely getting settled into their university dorm rooms. Campuses across the nation are filled with vibrant colours and activities. Frosh week songs and chants echo across the university neighbourhoods. Soon all the excitement will die down and school will start in earnest. While being away from home for the first time can be extremely exciting and liberating, it can also be very overwhelming and intimidating. Many students will silently struggle with navigating through the process of newfound independence and for some this may lead to a struggle with body image and unhealthy habits.

Gaining a New Perspective

In Western society, the idea of gaining weight is often viewed as the ultimate sin. We associate weight gain with failure, while we view weight loss as a sign of strength. For me, I wanted to get smaller, because I craved acceptance, even though it was acceptance from a superficial place.

 

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