Coping

Calling All Moms in Eating Disorder Recovery: You Are Not Alone

TRIGGER WARNING: The following content mentions eating disorder symptoms and may be triggering for some individuals - please read with caution.

My husband and I were in our mid 30s when our first daughter was born. Although we were elated to become parents, we were also shocked into broad sweeping life changes. We both had successful careers, a vibrant social life, a variety of athletic activities that we enjoyed together and individually, and practically no limitations on our time. Now, as parents, our hearts and lives were changed forever.

Writing My Way Back to Control

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How many tools do you use to cope? I don’t know about you but I use many. Depending on the situation I may journal, call a friend or support, distract, confront; I take walks climb trees, draw, color, and play games. However I would say the thing that has been the most help to me is writing.

Self- Love

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I used to feel betrayed by my body, like she was constantly trying to undermine every effort I made to change her. I always thought that if my body loved me, and was working for me, then why wouldn't she do what I wanted her to do? Why didn't she look the way I wanted her to look? I was never taught that she was on my side.

Language of Recovery

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Photo bySam MannsonUnsplash

Ten years ago I began to see signs in a different language–signs that I ignored. However, even though I disregarded them, they persisted in ever growing intensity.  Was I a traveler exploring this vast world of ours? No. I was just a mom who held down a part time job while homeschooling my two daughters full time.  So, what were these foreign signs?  They were the signs of my youngest daughter’s journey down the rabbit hole we call eating disorders.

If I’ve learned anything….

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Trigger Warning: the following materials may be triggering for some individuals - please read with caution.

How do you make someone else understand exactly what it’s like to hate yourself? They usually just don’t get it and the conversation ends up as something like this:

“There must be something about yourself that you love.. Or at least like”

“I mean, I get good grades, so I guess I’m not a complete idiot”

RecoverED and Dating

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Photo by Cooper Smith on Unsplash

Starting my recovery was the hardest decision I ever made, but I was thankful to have a supportive and trusting person by my side. My partner was the first person I ever opened up to about my eating disorder. Before them, like many, I was very secretive and ashamed of my disorder. Recently, that relationship has ended and as hard as it has been, re-entering the dating world has proven to be even more difficult.

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